Brace for tourist crowds coming to LA this summer – next stop the Hollywood Museum with Entertainment Publicists Professional Society (EPPS)

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Hollywood Museum is gearing up for a blockbuster summer tourism season and for good reason, too. LA Inc. reports a new record number of visitors and spending in the history ofLos Angeles occurred last year. About 26.9 million people visited LA in 2011, a jump of 4.2 percent more overnight visitors than in 2010. Tourist spending also rose with visitors racking up $15.2 billion in expenditures – an eight percent hike from the previous year.

image of George McQuade, Julian Myers
(L-R) George McQuade, Henri Bolinger and Julian Myers at EPPS Winter Mixer at the Hollywood Museum, Highland and Hollywood Blvd.

“It looks like the economy is getting a little better,” Donelle Dadigan, founder & president, Hollywood Museum told this writer at the annual Winter Mixer of Entertainment Publicists Professional Society (EPPS). Dadigan said the museum has 10,000 real showbiz treasures, located in the historical Max Factor building near the Kodak Thater and Hollywood Walk of Fame
(Highland Ave. & Hollywood Blvd.).

Max Factor, wizard of movie make-up,
has worked his magic on motion picture stars since 1935. On the ground floor, you’ll find many original displays from the old Max Factor Make-Up Studio.

The lobby, has been restored to its original grandeur. A polished Art Deco gem – a white and rose-colored oasis of lavish marble, recreated historic chandeliers, pastel hues, antique furniture, trompe l’oeil, faux finishes with 22kt. gold and silver leafing.

EPPS Pres. Henri Bolinger poses for a shot with Founder and Pres. of Hollywood Museum, which is expecting record Crowds this summer.

The Hollywood Museum features four floors of exhibits
(two floors above the lobby and a basement below), offering more than 35,000 square feet of exhibit space. To give you an idea of the size, it is seven times the size of the nearby Guinness World of Record Museum (5,200 square feet). It is nearly four times the size of the neighboring Ripley’s Believe It Or Not museum (10,000 square feet), and five times larger than the Warner Bros Museum
(at 7,000 square feet).

“We still really don’t have enough room to do justice to the thousands of items on exhibit here,” explain Dadigan.

The ground floor is made up of the historic Lobby, plus Max Factor’s restored make-up rooms, a vintage B&W photo gallery featuring more than 1000 B&W photos, Cary Grant’s Rolls Royce, Planet of the Apes, Jurassic Park, a tribute to Judy Garland and the “Red Shoes”.

The second and third floors are devoted exclusively to costumes worn by famous stars in famous films, corresponding props, photos, memorabilia and posters. Also featured is a wealth of Hollywood memorabilia, ranging from the earliest Technicolor film ever shot, to a Roman bed from “Gladiator”, to the dog from “There’s something about Mary”, to the gold Cadillac from “Dreamgirls”.

Marilyn Monroe's 1961 Cadillac Fleetwood. You could almost hear Marilyn say, "Okay, home james."

When you go down stairs to the open lower level Marilyn Monroe’s 1961 Cadilla Fleetwood greets you in mint condition. Be sure to visit the lower level, which was once a bowling alley and speakeasy during Prohibition days. Now it is where the Museum houses “all things creepy and scary”

You get to walk down the same jail cell corridor that Jodie Foster walked in “Silence of the Lambs”, and see Hannibal’s cell and a fantastic array of props from the film including Dr. Hannibal Lecter’s mask. Wear tennis shoes, because there are floors and floors of posters, black and white photos and memorabilia from Hollywood. If you park at the Kodak complex, the first two hours of park is free with validation.

LA Inc’s Mark Lieberman  said, This year’s impressive growth in tourism is great news for our local businesses that rely on tourist spending to make their companies both successful and profitable.” According to those people keeping track one out of every 10 jobs are related to tourism, which employs 364,000 people. And that’s why we should see a huge economic impact on tourism this summer, too.

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Social Media experts say its all about the “Experience” and how you “distinguish” yourself from others

Entertainment Publicists Professional Society Workshop on Social Media at ICG Local 600, Hollywood, CA.

Publicists Learn that “New Media is not new” and “Social Media is the user experience” at EPPS Workshop in Hollywood, CA

By George S. Mc Quade III
West Coast Bureau Chief
O’Dwyer Publications, NY
www.odwyepr.com

“Everything is merging, and it’s about the experience, it’s not about shoving it down your throat, that doesn’t work any more and new media is not new,” Creative Director Dror Mohar, Fuzeit.com

Wylie Stateman, Fuzeit.com, Eric Swatrzman Dror Mohar, Fuzeit.com at EPPS Social Media workshop.

told Entertainment Publicists Professional Society (EPPS) crowd at a media workshop Thursday (May 20, 2010) on “A discussion on new terminology and how to overcome the fear of this new media” It was sponsored by the International Cinematographers Union Local 600, Hollywood, CA.

“If you’re not relevant on Google, you won’t found,” said James Hipkin, Red 8 Studios, a leading global interactive and broadcast design agency with offices in Los Angeles, Toronto and Shanghai. “The consumer is taking more and more control on how they want to receive information, and when they want to receive it.  And that’s a key fundamental shift.  It’s no longer about shouting at consumers. It’s now about having the consumer listen to what you say based on when and how they want it.”

Hipkin says there’s a lot of hysteria around DVR’s and not all of it is factual.

Publicists learned that “exclusives” are a thing of the past, and unless media assets like videos, audio and images are tagged and cataloged, they have no value.

“You need to start thinking more sophisticated about platforms,” said Eric, Schwartzman, Online specialists and author of a new book coming out on social media.

“How are you going to post your social media on your own site when you do control the data? There used to be a clique that said, ‘content is king. And the idea was if you owned a copyright, you were ultimately in control of the marketplace, because you could withhold access to it if you’d like to. But we know that’s not possible anymore.

Eric Schwartzman Social Media Expert

And if content truly was the king, how did Steve Jobs corner the record industry without owning a single copyright? He made it easier to get music through iTunes than anyone else could provide. Although compelling content is critical, it’s got to be easy to get.”

Scwartzman says “New Media” is not new anymore. “What you should be thinking about is Social Media, and you have to think less like Warren Cowen (prominent American film industry publicist –Rogers & Cowan, who died May 14, 2008), may he rest in peace, and more like ‘Julie’ the cruise director of the ‘Love Boat’, because you’re making a community helping others communicate amongst themselves.”

Sandi Padnos, EPPS board member, James Hipkin, Red 8 Studios, Doug Faigin, CNS and Richard Knafelc, PR Newswire.

“We all know everything, the information is out there,” said Mohar, fuseit.com. “It’s easy to get access to make the same (media) pitch that any one else does. It’s even easier to get that context, and resurface it, but it’s how it feels, and how it feels on so many levels, not how it feels to just your customer, your consumer, your client, but how it feels to you.”

“Social media has not changed the way we gather news,” said President Doug Faigin, of City News Service (CNS) , the largest metro wires service in the country serving southern California, which 90 percent of the media subscribe to.

EPPS Media workshop on Social Media. “Don’t rule out traditional media City News Service Doug Faigin told publicists. Photo by MAYO PR

“Because of the economic difficulty the region is undergoing, whenever we have a rare opening, we get far more resumes and the quality of journalists applying for jobs at CNS are rated higher.”

The difficulty Faigin sees with new media is fact checking. “How do you know it’s credible, just because it’s out there is it right? The old media has the credibility of some expertise regardless how controversial the piece (story) may be suspect. Never the less, it’s a starting point, and not some blogger out their spouting off his or her ideas that may or may not be based on fact.”

Panelists also warn to not overlook traditional media, TV, radio and newspaper. “We still have AM and FM radio,” said Account Manger Richard Knafelc, PR Newswire.” “There’s some content that works better down different pipes. The definition of New Media is like an awkward teenager. He makes a lot of noise, but doesn’t do much.

Richard Knafelc, PR Newswire tells publicist content can not be “crap in and crap” out in distribution of media.

It doesn’t matter what service or distribution you use, but it comes down to content. We can throw everything under the sun out there for our clients, but if the content is crap in and crap out, it doesn’t matter how you get it out there. That’s something I’ve come across quite a bit. We try to educate our clients that just because there’s a new toy out there to play with, it doesn’t mean it’s going to cost you more than if you distribute it traditionally going wide.”

“You should think about all mixes of media, but distributing it in a private label fashion,” said Wylie Stateman, co-founder and CEO of fuzeit.com.

Wylie Stateman, Fuzeit.com, which produces 10 percent of the multimedia film market Online has earned six Oscars over last 15 years. Stateman has been personally nominated for five Academy awards and several British Academy awards. photo by MAYO PR.

“You’re not sending out your important information through YouTube, Twitter or whatever. We think there’s a future in multimedia, if you have control in delivery of it.  You should be able to analyze who receive it, how they use it, and if they shared it. But the most important thing is to develop compelling content.”

Fuszeit.com, which produces 10 percent of the multimedia film market Online has earned six Oscars over last 15 years. Stateman has been personally nominated for five Academy awards and several British Academy awards.
“I need a publicist, because no one really knows who I am,” said Stateman. “It’s important to understand not only the need for content, but the production of content. What we have done at fuzeit.com is develop tools to allow people to express themselves with video, with audio, with images and texts.”

Schwartzman noted the President Obama’s White House staff capitalized on Social Media and keywords like “Freedom”

To reach the panelists all prefer email:

James Hipkin: james@red8studios.com

Richard Knafelc: Richard.knafelc@prnewswire.com

Dror Mohar: dmohar@fuzeit.com

Erick Schwartzman: ericbennettschwartzman@gmail.com

Wylie Stateman: wstateman@fuzeit.com

For Entertainment Publicity call MAYO Communications,
818-340-5300 or 818-618-9229 or Publicity@MayoCommunications.com

Social media adds powerful boost to campaigns say experts

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If you want to do social media you need to engage your target audience and treat them intelligently. That was the overriding message at a sold-out Entertainment Publicists Professional Society (EPPS) crowd at a media workshop on “How To Do Social Media.” It was sponsored by the International Cinematographers Union Local 600, Hollywood, CA.

EPPS Media Workshop

Sandi Pannos, EPPS at the podium to kick off Social Media Workshop at ICG Local 600 Auditorium, Hollywood this month.
(photos by George S. Mc Quade III – MAYO PR)

“It is possible to measure ROI,” but according to Panelist Sally Falkow, Expansion Plus, “Campaigns take four to six weeks of research and strategy and can cost from several thousand dollars to millions. “We don’t go by retainer, but more by the project, because it really depends upon how much time is involved and how long your project runs,” she said.

Falkow was joined by a handful of social media experts, who offered tips and resources on “How To Do Social Media.”

“Movie fans and visitors love behind the scenes marketing of movies,” said Vice President Wayne Bennett of MOVIESET (www.movieset.com), which is based in Vancouver, B.C. The free membership site helps market movies via images, on-the-set interviews and constant blogging. Bennet, a 20 year TV and movie production veteran, uses his social media skills to assist television production and publicity departments.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9OrBQjyPlIA

“You have to type what’s going on behind the camera for fans all over the world,”  Bennett explained. “It might be the director of photography on how he lit the shot, or in the case of Peter Jackson in King Kong, before Facebook, YouTube and Twitter; he was literally posting photos of prop guys, costume fittings with actors, on the scene location scouts activities and video blogs. Jackson built this buzz that topped a million fans, who were already engaged in the process and the movie by the time he finished it for distribution.”

Wayne Bennett

The panel also briefly talked about Widgets, which can be placed on a site or blog, allowing interaction with the visitor without leaving the site. For example:  the Red Cross might have a widget on a blog, where you can donate directly to Haiti earthquake victims.

Panelists also recommended the funneling all your social media sites such as Facebook, Myspace, LinkedIn, Twitter on one portal such as http://www.tweetdeck.com, where you can organize your feeds and tweets.

“Nonprofit organizations do not tell there story very well,” said President Larry Eason, DotOrgpower, Los Angeles.  The digital strategy and communications firm helps dot orgs harness the web and new media to achieve their goals. He works with cause leaders to expand their sense of what is possible Online. He claims to be an evangelist for the power of Online story-telling to move the public, donors and influentials. “You need to treat your audiences intelligently when telling your stories,” explained Eason.

Eason pioneered the use of new media for the Public Interest Research Groups (PIRGs) starting a first-of-its-kind in-house media center, which was acquired by Virilion where he worked with cause and corporate clients such as eBay and Georgetown University.

“You need to target your community groups, mobile interaction, action platforms, and set your goal,” said Mac McLean, Click Communications, North Hollywood, CA. “Before forming Click Communications in May, 2007, McLean handled theatrical promotions, worked at a national advertising agency and did publicity for major studios.

Some panelists noted that 60 percent of the marketing campaigns are spent on social media strategy versus 40 percent on PR and Marketing. “It is one more layer of client management, but for a restaurant the goal is to get people in the door,” said Caroline Rustigian Bruderer, CEO of K-LINE 7 Co., Orange County.

While everyone thought the best way to market your   film is social networking and the best marketing tool   is Facebook with more than 400 million users other tactics surface.

EPPS Media workshop

“Every movie or TV project has a core audience, and   the Internet is the most strategic way to get to those   people,” explained MOVIESET’S Bennett. “This    allows you to do the EPK and other advertising much   later. The concept is Production is the new    Promotion, and the sooner you engage your audience the sooner they are going to grab onto it, and follow the different phases to the point where you get to your last news release or airing. There will be much more information that surfaces to the top of Google than there would be in putting out a short release over six weeks.”

Entertainment companies and filmmakers are leveraging the power of social media by marketing their films to international audiences and building loyal audiences and communities around their work.

Another tactic mentioned are RSS feeds, which in layman’s terms stands for real simple syndication or officially “rich site summary for delivering regularly changing web content. All agreed that to increase web traffic PR pros need an RSS feed on their client’s website or blog to whoever subscribes or wants the content.

New York Times, TV Guide, Advertising Age and People Magazine Editors Share New Media Insights with LA Entertainment Publicists

EPPS media workshop on NY Media at ICG Union Local 600 sponsored event

Twitter, Facebook and social networks have become mainstream for entertainment writers and editors, Entertainment Publicists Professional Society (EPPS) members learned recently(11-19-09) at a media workshop sponsored by the International Cinematographers (ICG) Union Local 600 in Hollywood.

West Coast Editor Michael Fleeman, People.com said, “Whether we like it or not, reporters are being dragged into new media, some kicking and screaming about it. You have to know how to do it, and you have to file under deadline.”

New York Times Reporter Edward Wyatt, Los Angeles said reporters are being asked to post their stories Online and twitter about it. “Sometimes I record audio interviews or TV interviews and post them on the site,” he said. Wyatt cautions PR Pros to not miss the forest for the trees.  “If you have a webisode that is attracting 50,000 eyes, and you want to tell me about it great, but it the television show associated with it attracts 16 million people a week, that’s the meat of the story.”

Edward Wyatt New York Times

Wyatt covers the television business in LA. He joined the Times in New York in 1995 as a finance and investing reports and has covered education, the redesign of the World Trade Center site, the 2004 Democratic primaries, publishing business, as well as professional cycling and the Tour de France. He moved to LA in 2006 to cover Television.

New York Times Reporter Wyatt also said he’s looking for national stories, because the Times just doesn’t report on Manhattan stories. “When I came to LA I found we had not done a story on Two-and-a-Half Men, which is the biggest comedy on television and watched all over the country,” he said. “A lot of people in Manhattan don’t watch it, but people in Iowa, Kansas and elsewhere do. So if you bring stories with a national pace, we’re interested.”

.

Los Angeles Reporter Andrew Hampp for Advertising Age echoed other complaints of panelists on publicists’ followup calls on a pitch.

Andrew Hampp, Ad Age Michael Fleeman People Mag.

“Please don’t pitch me after you received a big NO from another editor above me,” he said. “We are still a work in progress, and started our website three years ago. We have separate website andmagazine editors and then we share editing staff. It’s about 99 percent original content on the website. There’s not much overlap between the magazine and website. The site is shorter, faster and more newsie, breasier and a younger user,” he said. Hampp said the print version deadline for  Ad Age magazine is Thursday or early Friday, and the AdAge.com has a daily and weekly newsletter so there is much to choose from through the week. He says deadlines are many at AdAge.com

Hampp’s pet peeves of PR Pros is that second followup phone call he receives after the press release has been received. “

Staff Editor Natalie Abrams, TVGuide.com said, “I think my biggest pet peeve is just the coordination on events,” said TVGuide.com’s Natalie Abrams. “ I’ll get three separate emails a network publicist, a studio publicist, a show publicist or a personal publicist for the actor, and it is all on the same thing, making it hard to decide who to respond to, so coordination on that end would be good,” she said.

TVGuide.com’s Abrams also  said they don’t have full time twitter people, but each writer or editor use new media to drive more traffic to TVGuide.com’s websites.

Abrams also agreed with Wyatt about lying, “if you don’t want it out there that your client is going to be killed off of a show, or that your show has been cancelled, we can embargoed it, just be honest with us.”

Natalie Abrams TV Guide

Natalie Abrams, staff editor, TV Guide.com is the west coast Staff editor at TVGuide.com, a one-stop entertainment and video content destination serving more than 20 million unique users per month. From television spoilers to insider scoops, Abrams breaks the latest in entertainment news. Since joining in September, 2009, she landed exclusive interviews with some of the hottest celebs including the cast of Glee, Lost, Grey’s Anatomy, 24 and 90210 among others.

Los Angeles Reporter Andrew Hampp for Advertising Age echoed other complaints of panelists on publicists’ followup calls on a pitch. “Please don’t pitch me after you received a big NO from another editor above me,” he said. “We are still a work in progress, and started our website three years ago. We have separate website and magazine editors and then we share editing staff. It’s about 99 percent original content on the website. There’s not much overlap between the magazine and website. The site is shorter, faster and more newsie, breazier and a younger user,” he said. Hampp said the print version deadline for  Ad Age magazine is Thursday or early Friday, and the AdAge.com has a daily and weekly newsletter so there is much to choose from through the week. He says deadlines are many at AdAge.com.

New York Times Wyatt told EPPS workshop that  his two pet peeves from entertainment publicist who pitch him include: “getting asked ‘who have you been talking to, which is none of your business when I am trying to just do a story”  and when publicist lies to their client, “because what will happen is one day I’ll meet your client at a cocktail party and they will say ‘why didn’t you talk to us to promote this new show of mine?’ This actually happened. I said, “Because I asked your publicist, and he said, “you couldn’t talk for X and Y reasons, and I was there on the set, and you walk right past me three or four times. Just don’t do that (lie).”

All panelist prefer email pitches, and most prefer early mornings, except for Edward Wyatt of the NY Times, because he deals with editors, who are three hours of ahead in the morning.

Wyatt@nytimes.com – 323-617-9034

Natalie. Abrams@tvguide.com – 323-856-4093

Michael_fleeman@peoplemag.com 310-268-7200

Ahampp@adage.com –  no phone number provided

Be sure to sign up for other media trend stories and behind the scenes stories (free) in entertainment publicity at the following sites Online:

MAYO PR

FACEBOOK/EntertainmentPublicity

LINKED-IN Entertainment Publicists Group

For entertainment Publicity for movies, TV and music
visit: www.MayoCommunications.com or
www.LAEntertainmentPublicity.com.

We welcome your comments, questions, suggestions and discussions. Thx.

Media Expert George Mc Quade To Talk Live On Evolution Of Media

MAYO'S V.P. George McQuade
MAYO’S V.P. George McQuade

Veteran TV/Radio Broadcaster turned Publicist Mc Quade To share secrets of PR business

LOS ANGELES, CA —Vice President George Mc Quade, MAYO Communications, an award-winning full service entertainment and public relations firm in Los Angeles is scheduled to appear live this Saturday, Sept. 19, 2009 on CSU Dominguez Hills campus HD TV station. Mc Quade will discuss the evolution of media, secrets to powerful media relations campaigns and public relations with TV host Chris Burnett, CSUDH.

“The media is changing faster than the media can even report on it,” said Mc Quade, who manages media relations and new business for MAYO Communications as V.P. “The most important message I drive home to students and budding PR Pros is to acquire as much digital media arts skills as possible from radio, TV to blogging and websites.  Even TV stations like KNBC have what they call a “content center,” which used to be the called the newsroom. Surviving writers, producers and editors are being retrained as multi-media experts writing their stories, but now recording radio and TV interviews, too, for instantly posting Online.”
Mc Quade will be available for call-in questions during the hour show segment that airs 2:30 – 3:30 pm, Saturday. The Public Relations Show begins at 1:50 p.m. He speaks regularly at publicity, broadcast news and film classes at USC, UCLA and Loyola Marymount University.
Mc Quade is currently the West Coast bureau chief for O’Dwyer Publications (www.odwyerpr.com), Manhattan, NY, where he writes a monthly column on everything from new media to entertainment publicity and public relations.  McQuade is the former president of Entertainment Publicists Professional Society (EPPS), Los Angeles and New York chapters, with nearly 500 publicist members nationwide.
Before MAYO Communications, McQuade was a Los Angeles correspondent for NBC Mutual Radio News, ABC Entertainment News and provided high profile stories as a reporter for KNX, KFI during the LA Riots and was most known as the news voice of KGIL Newstalk 1260 AM in the San Fernando Valley. His last TV news job was as an original writer for Today In LA Weekends, KNBC-TV Ch. 4 News, the first 90-minute weekend news broadcast in the market. He later moved to media relations at the nation’s largest Gas Company (SoCalGas Co.) and was Director of Public Relations at the Housing Authority of the City of Los Angeles.
MAYO Communications (www.MayoCommunications.com) is a full service marketing communications and PR firm with offices in LA, San Diego, New York and Bern, Switzerland, serving celebrity, corporate, government and nonprofit clients. A short list of MAYO clients include: USC, Southern California Leadership Council, SafeMedia Corporation, World-Trade Center LA/LB, Los Angeles County Economic Development Corporation (LAEDC) with Chief Economist Jack Kyser, senior vice president.
On the entertainment side the short list includes: H20 Productions, N.C., Music Artists Eddie Money, Benny Mardones, Stevie Wonder, Saints of the Underground (legendary rock artists from Alice Cooper, Ratt and Warrant) on Warrior Records.
The MAYO niche: “We don’t guarantee media, we just get it!”
For more about MAYO Communications visit: http://www.mayocommunications.com or call 818-340-5300.
About CSU Dominguez Hills — California State University, Dominguez Hills is a highly diverse, urban university located in the South Bay, primarily serving the Los Angeles metropolitan area. The university prides itself on its outstanding faculty and friendly, student-centered environment. Known for excellence in teacher education, nursing, psychology, business administration, and digital media arts, new degree programs include computer science, criminal justice, recreation and leisure studies, social work, and communication disorders. On campus is the Home Depot Center, a multi-purpose sports complex that hosts world-class soccer, tennis, track and field, lacrosse, and cycling.

Michael Jackson’s Last Show On Earth

King of Pop Michael Jackson  -    LIFE image
King of Pop Michael Jackson - LIFE image

A Live Event For a Dead Superstar Costs Taxpayers $5 Million Dollars

“This has gotten to the point, where AEG needs to step up to the plate and pay for the costs of Michael Jackson’s Memorial,” Los Angeles City Councilman Dennis

Zine said shortly after the event at Staples Center in Downtown Los Angeles.

From a publicity standpoint the numbers are still being tallied, but when all three networks, cable networks Fox and CNN broadcast an event live without sponsorship the lost could amount to millions of dollars. This is probably the most positive publicity Michael Jackson has received in his entire lifetime, even more than the 55 tour dates he was rehearsing for at Staples, which was shown during the live world telecast at Staples.

There was no news conference or news release needed, just a twitter or two, which also was over capacity from people tweeting inside and outside the event.

For the City of LA, $500 million in the red and sending employees home early on Fridays it was expensive. According to Zine the Swat Team and those who work anti terrorism were all called in for the media circus. Zine a former LAPD sergeant for several decades also noted that the freeways were shutdown impacting businesses and commuters to downtown Los Angeles and to and from the Forest Lawn Cemetery, where it all began at 8:00 A.M.

All the major networks put out the best LAPD message over the airwaves, “the best seat in the house is on your couch at home.” True. 17,000 plus people were issued lottery tickets, but many stayed home for the best seat in the house. So did this writer.

Overall, the ceremony was outstanding, the most dead air ever witnessed at a concert memorial, so quiet you could hear the air conditioners whirling. Most of the people inside the Staples who spoke harped on the same theme that Michael Jackson brought the world

together with songs like, “I will be there, we are the world,” and so on. The speeches were moving from Smokey Robinson, Berry Gordy, who go the largest standing ovation when he said, “Michael was the greatest entertainer ever,”; Usher, Stevie Wonder and even Reverend Al Sharpton was more low key, and on key with the same theme. “I just want you children to know there was nothing strange about your Daddy, but there were a lot of strange things your Daddy had to deal with,” said Rev. Sharpton.

There is always light at the end of the gloomy economic tunnel. In this case, one Holiday Inn hotel manager said after AEG announced the memorial to be held across the street from his Inn, 195 rooms sold out. Elsewhere, hotels did well, too and some estimates range from $3 to $4 million from those keeping track of the figures. Tomorrow will tell a new story, and the freeways will be packed again, not with limos but single car drivers.

Tomorrow’s headlines will probably read “King of Pop Saluted in Emotional Memorial.”

There is always light at the end of the gloomy economic tunnel. In this case, one Holiday Inn hotel manager said after AEG announced the memorial to be held across the street from his Inn, 195 rooms sold out. Elsewhere, hotels did well, too and some estimates

range from $3 to $4 million from those keeping track of the figures. Tomorrow will tell a new story, and the freeways will be packed again, not with limos but single car drivers.

Tomorrow’s headlines will probably read “King of Pop Saluted in Emotional Memorial.”

Paparrazzi is out of control say professional photographers

(Left - right) Giinevere Smith, APTV, Sam Mircovich, Reuters, Sara De Boer, photographer, Stewart Cook, Rex USA and Kathy Hutchins, Hutchins Photo.
(Left - right) Giinevere Smith, APTV, Sam Mircovich, Reuters, Sara De Boer, photographer, Stewart Cook, Rex USA and Kathy Hutchins, Hutchins Photo.

“It is out of control and we do not want people stealing our photos,” said Stewart Cook, photographer, Rex USA, at an Entertainment Publicists Professional Society (EPPS) workshop recently (3-19-09). The event was sponsored by International Cinematographers Group Local 600 publicists, Hollywood

“We have watermarks, but once a magazine publishes our photos and posts it Online, we are

constantly finding people ripping it off,” said Kathy Hutchins, president, Hutchins Photo.

“Magazines still want beautiful pictures, but they also want something different,” said Sara De Boer, photographer, Retna, a photo service.

“It is an interesting time we are in, and it may take years before we learn what format is best to preserve or protect our photos Online,” said Sam Mircovich, editor-in-charge, Global Entertainment Pictures, Thomson Reuters News Pictures. Thomson Reuters is the world’s largest international multimedia news agency, providing investing news, world news and business news. It also provides entertainment images and stories from Hollywood Reporter often end up on Reuters Wire services.

“We are subscription based internationally, so when photos hit the wire, they hit thousands of AP members globally, instantly,” said Associated Press Television (APTV)’s Guinevere Smith, Natn’l Entertainment Photo-Ed. “We work with publicists to understand your needs, and we work with staff photographers on the editorial side as well as contributing freelance photographers. AP work to achieve your goals as well as our (breaking news).”

 The Associated Press covers half of the globe with a bureau in nearly every city in the World. AP is an international news organization offering news, photos, graphics, audio and video for 1,700 U.S. newspapers and 6,000 broadcast outlets around the world. There are more than 240 bureaus worldwide representing 121 countries. It features a massive digital network, a continuously updated online news service, a television news service and one of the largest radio networks in the United States.  

“The pictures illustrate the story, and we are much like AP, but offer a little different services, “ said Mircovich.  “Reuters like the Associated Press, is one of the oldest wire services in the world, and I think there is a constant battle over who is older AP or us. I think we started around 1853. Reuters News Pictures is part of a larger company called Thomson Reuters, because were purchase last year by a data provider Thomson out of Canada,” he said.

“Our clients are newspaper and Online customers, explained Mirovich. “We supply (content) to many of the websites you see on the Internet. But what sets us a part from AP is we also provide data services and news to professionals on a subscription basis. We have  products for the legal side, for medical and financial clients as well. The photographs and data are all packaged in the subscription through a web browser. Entertainment plays a big part, because we report on the movie studios and conglomerates. The pictures help illustrate these stories. So we are the same as AP, but a little more targeted and different,” said Mircovich.

“We are a photo agency specializing in entertainment, some news and our client base goes anywhere from subscriptions to magazine sales,” said Kathy Hutchins, president, Hutchins Photo, LA. Other professional services charge a fee to become member to protect their watermarked images. “Everything in entertainment can be found on our site, but once it gets into magazines it is hard to protect them,” said Hutchins.  “You have to be a member, and pay a fee, which is how we track who is using our photos, and we have disabled the downloading feature for nonmembers.”

“We are losing control of our photos and after they are published in magazines they get copied by bloggers and others Online,”  said Stewart Cook, Photographer, Rex USA, which is Britain’s largest privately-owned agency with offices in New York, LA and which has a network of 600 photographers around the world. It has owned by the Selby’s for 60 years. “We specialized in entertainment, but we are also strong in features that range from one-legged skate boarding jocks to features on the military in Iraq.  We are one of two agencies that syndicate for the Ministry of Defense. We supply web print and video much like everyone else with one of the largest libraries.”

“I used to have a large staff, but when everything changed to digital, it wasn’t  economically feasible to continue the model, so I am by myself now,” said Sara De Boer, Photographer, Retna, LA.

“So now I am syndicated domestically and also syndicate to Sunday editions (publications) worldwide. I provide photo services of events, parties and celebrities. I also do a fair amount of work with the soap opera stars, and I really enjoy that. I do as many red carpet events as I can, and I am one of the most affected by digital photography changes and significantly impacted by the paparazzi.” 

At least two of the panelist said that many of the paparazzi are hired by gangs for as little as a $100 a day to hang out and shoot pictures of a breaking news events or celebrites. 

All photo services, Associated Press, Reuters and especially the smaller operations like to be pitched for events by email. “99 percent of what I do is by email, and when I get a fax I think ‘hmm this isn’t global green is it,” said De Boer.

The photography professional services and wire photo services experts offer these tips for publicists: 

  • Do not use vinyl as a backdrop, because it reflects a lot of light
  • Be aware of your lighting, especially on red carpet events; one spotlight is not enough
  • Show up early with lesser know clients at events; they will shoot most everyone if time permit
  • Advise your clients to wear color, avoiding solid white or black outfits
  • Advise clients not to cross their legs when posting (fashion especially)
  • Remember flashes pierce sheer black
  • Go ahead of your client with a client name in large, bold type for ID
  • Stay out of the photos; mnay photogs are shooting long lenses down the carpet
  • Be aware when a “A” list star is approaching, step back. Resume when they have passed
  • Have a realistic space for press cleared; 12” per position is minimum, 18” is preferred
  • Be honest with tip sheets; photogs would rather have surprises than disappointments
  • Check-in time should be accurate, not an hour before you intend to check in
  • Communication if you are marking placement for photos in press area
  • All events are not equal; Photos will support small events if given access to the “good” ones
  • Avoid “set decoration” feeling; don’t change colors on various background be consistent
  • Put photogs first on a press line; flow is proven to be better
  • Keep Photo, TV and Print in separate areas; some TV-B-roll like to work behind photogs
  • Stanchions should be at least 7 feet from the backdrop; Risers should be 18” back and 12 ‘ high
  • Allow room under rises to store equipment, bags, etc
  • If you have no risers, say so on tip sheet as most photogs have step stools or ladders
  • Backdrops should be cloth, not glossy plaster; grey or blue works best
  • Be aware of who works for whom; avoid more than one photog per agency in limited space

To contact any of the professional photography services:

Stewart Cook assignmentdesk@rexusa.com

Mary Allison, ET Assignments., AP LA” malison@asp.org

Sara De Boer – saradeboer@mac.com

 Kathy Hutchins – Hutchins@aol.com

Sam Mircovich – sam.mircovich@thomsonreuters.com